Module 2! – Week 10 at CTC

So module 1 is finally finished, and it is time to move on to my next four subjects: Instruments (INST), Radio Navigation (RNAV), Flight Planning (FPL), and Performance (PERF). I’ve been looking forward to this subject a while as it contains some of the most practical and relevant subjects in the entirety of ground school – we also get a free sim session at some point, but more on that soon…

Before everything could kick off however, we were fortunate enough to get a long weekend after our exams, so as soon as my results came through I headed back up to Sheffield and surprised my family, who had no idea I’d be turning up! It was fantastic going home for the first time since moving out, though it felt very strange going back to my old room – especially having gotten used to my double bed in my CTC home. And of course, I was most pleased to be reunited with my dogs, who followed me everywhere for the majority of the time I was home!

Mucky Pups!

I made my way home on Monday afternoon since I rescheduled my module 1 interview for the Tuesday morning, since otherwise I would only have been to CTC for that on Monday… Turns out that was a very wise plan as the interview took less than 10 minutes anyway – and fortunately there was nothing negative to be said of me! After a couple of hours waiting, we started our first class of module 2, basic instruments. It has to be said that this half of instrumentation is exceedingly boring as, while reasonably relevant to at least our basic flying, it is largely very repetitive and entirely fact based. Nevertheless, with a few hot chocolates to keep awake it really isn’t too hard to grasp – the main thing is understanding pressure relationships and a bit of gyroscopes. Fortunately this is also a relatively short subject too, and we finished the basic half the following day!

The other subject we studied this week was RNAV. This is all about the different radio navigation aids we can use, like NDBs, VORs and ILSs. Quite honestly another dull subject so far, there’s a lot of learning about frequencies, and going into incredible detail which doesn’t always seem incredibly relevant. Apparently that’s just because there’s a lot of specific knowledge to this subject however, and next week we’ll get on to discussing the uses of each navaid and do some exercises requiring some thought!

This week went incredibly quickly, especially thanks to only being four days long! I took the weekend as easy as possible, since the trip to Sheffield at the start of the week had been a lot of effort, as had staying awake for much of the rest of my time! Oh well, it’s all for the end goal, which is getting closer by the day – only 3.5 months until I’m up in the air again if all goes to plan! Hopefully I’m now back on schedule by the way, and I think I can keep weekly updates up for at least the next month!

Thanks for reading,
Jackson

P.S. Can you believe my last weekly post was at week 4?! Time has flown by (and that pun is just unavoidable)…

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2 thoughts on “Module 2! – Week 10 at CTC

  1. Hi Jackson,

    I’d like to start by saying that i thoroughly enjoy reading ur blog and i hope to join ctc in a few years.

    I read in ur weeks 2-3 post that u chose not to attend university. This is something i want ur advise about. Im 17 years old, with some flight experience and its my last year of high school.

    Do u advise me to get a college degree first before becoming a pilot? Ive talked to some airline pilots and they say its good bcuz u have a backup in case something medically happens to u, plus u cud get additional jobs in the airline while being a pilot (like a manager of a department). But im concerned about seniority.

    Whats ur advise on this matter?

    Also, i heard that for the whitetail program, once u finish u need to wait up till a max of 2 years to get a job, r u gonna take advantage of university in that time interval?

    Thanks in advance.

    Patrick

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    1. Hi Patrick,
      Glad you’re enjoying the blog!

      Honestly the degree thing depends on quite a lot. In any case it is better to have a degree in something, as it will look good on CVs and, on average, those with degrees do get paid more in their chosen career (though I can’t say I know if that relates to pilots). On the other hand, you may not want to spend 3+ years of your life, and thousands of pounds, on a degree when really your dream is to fly; those were my reasons not to go to university.

      One convenient work-around, which I have taken advantage of, is to take a degree tailored to your flight training course. CTC (and probably some other schools) offer a BSC (Hons) in Professional Aviation Pilot Practice which won’t really give you much to fall back on since it is a degree for pilots, but will still look very good on paper and is thus likely to bring all sorts of benefits. It’s also designed so you aren’t given loads of work at the wrong time – you don’t do anything until you start flying!
      You can read more about it, and the rest of the CTC Wings course, here – http://www.ctcaviation.com/aspiring-pilot/training/wings/

      I’m not quite sure where you heard something about 2 years waiting but that is absolutely not true! Once you’ve finished the course, you could theoretically be offered a job (or at least an interview) immediately; In fact the record for the shortest wait is something like 5 minutes!
      Maybe you are thinking about the fact it could be up to 2 years from when you START before getting a job – the CTC course is 18 months and the longest you can be in the hold pool for a job before you’re on your own is 6 more months. Most people get a job far sooner, the average wait is less than 3 months from finishing at CTC right now.

      Hope that helps!
      Jackson

      Like

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