Module 1 Summary

So, I’m done with my first bunch of exams! This also means I’m more than 1/3 of the way through ground school – a fact I can’t quite believe… I know I’ve neglected posting for a while but things got really busy all of a sudden and I never found the time – I’m going to try getting back to at least a fortnightly schedule for the whole of module 2! This is just going to be a short, quick summary of the last month so I can get everything caught up.

Obviously the main theme has been work, work and more work. I really settled in to a good rhythm for revision, as that has made up a good portion of the last month. Lots of evening trips to CTC since I’m a bit of a night owl, but that also means it’s easy to find a quiet room to revise, which is very important when you’re as easily distracted as I am!

I guess the best way to do this is a little summary of my thoughts on each subject so far, so without further ado…

Human Performance – 87%

This is sort of a mix of physiology and psychology – about half the course looks at various systems in the body, while the other half is all about the way pilots think and ways to reduce and manage errors.

I thought HPL was definitely on the easier side of module 1’s subjects, it was all facts and frankly a lot of those were common sense! Only curveball is that you get some really weird questions in this subject, and I definitely got a couple of those… Thankfully I had plenty of questions I recognised which made the exam not at all stressful.

 

General Navigation – 88%

This is all the basic navigation principles that dictate a lot of the behind-the-scenes stuff in navigation systems, like great circles, all sorts of different charts, and various time and altitude calculations.

Gnav started out seeming incredibly difficult, but the more I did it the more I realised it was actually reasonably enjoyable, most of it is just simple maths and if you know the equations you know at least 75% of the subject.

 

Mass and Balance – 90%

This is all about loading aircraft, and largely keeping it within limits (primarily Centre of Gravity). There’s also a fair bit of using CAP aircraft documentation and load sheets.

M&B was definitely the easiest exam for me – it was even simpler maths than Gnav, and I really didn’t get given any weird questions! There’s very little in this subject as a whole so there’s only so much that can be asked. I didn’t feel super confident in some of my answers for the exam, but since I never doubted my methods I stuck with those answers and considering I got my highest percentage in this exam I obviously got it!

 

Principles of Flight – 77%

This was all sorts of aerodynamic theory which dictates some of the ideas of how an aircraft flies, generally in far more detail than a pilot ever needs… Despite the very fundamental sounding name!

PoF was my least favourite subject and definitely the most difficult, as I did struggle to understand some of the topics for a while mid-course. Fortunately 77% is still a pass, though it did bring my average down a little bit since my other scores were fairly close.

 

Overall, I’m pretty happy with these results, and with all first-time passes and an average of 85.5% (more than good enough to get hired by almost all CTC partner airlines) I have nothing to worry about!

Now I’m moving on to module 2, with Radio navigation, Instruments, Performance, and Flight Planning. I’m actually a couple of weeks in already (updates on that very shortly) and overall I’m enjoying this module a bit more, a lot of it feels a bit more relevant than module 1! I am glad I’ve got that out of the way though – I’m 1/3 of the way towards flying in New Zealand!

On that note, thanks for reading – I’ll be posting again soon so keep an eye out for than!

Jackson

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